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Dissertation Fellows

Each academic year, the Center awards fellowships to students enrolled in a College of the Liberal Arts department or program, who each conduct scholarship that reflects the CDD's concern with civic life and the character and quality of public discourse.

Past recipients of the CDD Graduate Fellowship have received a one-semester release (fall or spring) from teaching or related service and a research grant to humanities graduate students in the College of the Liberal Arts who are supported on assistantships. Under the sponsorship of the CDD, Dissertation Fellows become involved in a weekly, faculty-led dissertation writing group, and present their research in a public venue.

This year's CDD Dissertation Fellows are listed below:

Lauren Camacci is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Communication Arts and Sciences. She specializes in critical studies of men and masculinity and the American presidency during the Cold War. Her dissertation investigates the rhetoric of and about President Richard Nixon as a reflection of as well as a blueprint for the mood of American hegemonic masculinity during the Nixon presidential years (1968-1974). By analyzing Nixon's rhetoric, the project examines the metonymic quality of the American presidency during this tumultuous time and considers this era as a rhetorical antecedent for the current state of American mainstream masculinity. Camacci holds a B.A. in Communication from The College of Wooster (2011) and an M.A. in Communication Arts and Sciences from Penn State (2014).

Jeremy David Johnson is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Communication Arts and Sciences. His research broadly examines the rhetoric of science and technology, often theorizing digital rhetoric and its intersections with politics. His dissertation investigates the relationships between rhetoric and algorithms, examining how algorithms invoke rhetorical reactions, reshape rhetorical interactions, and become generators of rhetorical activity. Combining ancient rhetorical theory and posthuman conceptions of agency, his project analyzes three crucial moments in which algorithms reshaped the U.S. political landscape. Jeremy holds a B.A. from Ripon College (2012) and an M.A. in Communication Arts and Sciences from Penn State (2014).

Keren Wang is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Communication Arts and Science, where he specializes political theory and rhetorical criticism from comparative and global perspectives. His research focuses on exploring the genealogy of ideas, including the divergent histories of philosophy, of literature and art, of science and religion, and of political and legal thought that underpin contemporary discourse on globalization and international affairs.

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